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to l u-s adoptions.. why?? plus meet one family who's gotten stuck in the middle this international dispute. join us for cbs 5 eyewitness news this morning... beginng at 4:30. good morning. it's friday, ,,,, >>> here's look at forecast in some cities around the country. washington, d.c., partly sunny, 42. atlanta, partly sunny, 54. st. louis, cloudy, 38, denver, mostly cloudy, 33, seattle, mostly cloudy, 44 degrees. >>> here's another look at this morning's top stories. general norman swargts schwarzkopf died at his home yesterday in tampa, florida. he drove iraqi forces out of kuwait. he died from complications related to pneumonia. he was 78 years old. >>> and president obama meets with congressional leaders this afternoon at the white house to try to cut a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. in just four days across-the-board spending cuts take effect. >>> if president obama and congress fails to reach an agreement the price of milk could lead sharply. perhaps $6 per gallon. at issue is the farm bill and how much the federal government pays farmers. john blackstone reports.
international correspondent arwa damon explains, the city's combat zones are expanding each and every day. >> reporter: they are home again, but they are cold and broke and still in danger. about a third of the families who fled the neighborhood of aleppo have come back. only to find out that these streets are now on the front line lines. if the regime can retake the city, it can cut off the main artery for opposition forces in aleppo and reopen a route to the airport. on a nearby hill top, the neighborhood, the rebels used to control that as well, but lost it a month ago. the battle lines here are constantly fluid. and snipers are a constant threat. the front line is visible just through here. and we can barely make out three bodies. the rebel fighters are telling us that there are two male and one female. there were five. they managed to extract two, but they can't reach the others. for the children here, gunfire has become background noise. this 12-year-old hardly notices. she says she's not afraid anymore. to start with, little hala is also chatty. but then gets scared. her father say
corporation. next friday, december 7, the city club welcomes aaron david miller, vice president of new initiatives and distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson international center for scholars. friday, december 14th. the city club will host an roman, president and ceo of the national association to end homelessness. please visit our web site, ski club.org, for information about our upcoming forum or to listen to a podcast of any of our past programs. we'll like to welcome guests from human in humana care, and mutual. thank you for your support. we would like to welcome to today's programs students who are joining us from area high school. student participation is made possible by a generous gift from the chars sparr trust. will the students please stand and be recognize it. [applause] >> now we would like to return to our speaker for our traditional city club question and answer period. we welcome questions from everyone, including guests, holding the microphone today is program directer kerry miller, may we have our first question, please. >> mr. broussard, you talked about the co
in the capital city of damascus. as opposition forces say that they could accept an international peace keeping force if president assad steps aside. meanwhile, a u.s.-based monitor confirms the country's two-day internet blackout is now over. conner powell is live for us in the region with the very latest. conner? >> heather, the internet is now on in damascus, but appears much of the rest of syria is still without internet and other mobile phone connection. the assad government blamed that disconnection on terrorists, but outside monitoring groups say no, in fact it's the assad regime that cut the connection. the question is why would they do that? we've seen more and more fighting getting closer and closer to damascus. particularly into the areas where the government is the strongest, like around the airport, which has been open and planes have been coming and going since the start of this war nearly two years ago. in the last two days, fighting has gotten particularly heavy and flights have been canceled out of the international airport. the rebels at one point claimed to have held the road
city's la guardia airport. philly international delays. it's likely we'll continue to see the delays piling up across northeast. even when the rainfall and snowfall is over because you'll still have to deal with that wind gusting over 30, 40 miles per hour at times across northeast and that's also going to make it feel a lot colder. so keep that in mind. wind chill temperatures typically between 5 to 10 degrees cooler than what the thermometer means. the winter storm warnings in pen opinion and other partials are in effect and in some spots, even into tomorrow morning, and again that's because of the wind. it will be picking up that snow that's on the ground and blowing it around and producing near whiteout conditions along roadways. very dangerous out there. you really shouldn't be doing any commuting if you don't have to. look how much additional snowfall, this is on top of what we already have on the ground expected across portions of new england. that dark blue is over a foot of snow and that purple, that's over two feet of snow. so incredible and very impresssive amount, even th
in my campus community, made a commitment to invest in the city as well which was really the turning point in my life and set me on a completely different trajectory. i was president of my student body, i interned for congressman joseph p. kennedy who has since required, a congressman -- retired. i then went on to work for united states senator john kerry for 11 years and ultimately was recruited to run for office, was elected in 2009. i am 38. this is where you say i look much younger than that. [laughter] i love coming to this space, good lighting. [laughter] but i think, again, i can speak to this personally because now that i am an elected official, the only woman serving on that body and the first woman of color in that body in its history -- mass. [applause] now, why does that matter, why is that relevant? i appreciate the applause, it has nothing to do with a personal achievement. i think it's a shared victory for all of us. it means that the solutions we're developing in government are more comprehensive and fully informed because of that perspective. so i've thought a great
-- that will not produce results regarding safety, especially internal safety. guest: terrorism is a problem that has plagued the u.s. for many years. it certainly did not start with the attacks of 9/11. people remember the oklahoma city bombing in the 1990's, the first world trade center bombing in 1993. there were other attacks in the 1980's. dhs has stood up in the past to provide a more comprehensive and systematic approach toward addressing the threat of terrorism one of the challenges that always faces the dhs is that if they do their job perfectly and they do need well, no one will ever notice they are actually there. in other words, if there is never another terrorist attack against the united states, is it because dhs is doing a good job, or because of other factors? or because of other factors? it is
gust, but nothing that's consistent that will stop the traffic at cleveland-hopkins international airport. we checked with them. no major delays or cancellations from overnight into this morning. there have been some cancellations. we know hundreds of them, and delay, up in the midwest because of this storm. city officials here are watching this very closely as john said a few moments ago. seven deaths across four states blamed on this storm, including two in iowa. on wednesday, there was blinding snow that caused a 30-car pileup. we know that two people died in that storm. we just checked this morning. about 13,000 customers in des moines still without power on this very, very cold morning. here in cleveland, city officials know that this will get worse as the day goes on and as we go into saturday. the mayor says that the city is prepared with more than 100 drivers with the trucks. 50 trucks going around the clock to get snow off the roads. once it starts to accumulate. and there are 22,000 tons of salt to clear the roads. yes, big snowflakes. the wind right now is kicking up. t
of financial support they got from the opposition or international community. would that make the situation more difficult? despite that, all of these liberated areas, they became very excited. they start thinking about some civilian projects. in one city, as example, six elementary and secondary schools are out of service. no one is interested to send his kids to the school. when i left the city -- next week, a fighter jet hits one of the schools. this is why none of the people are interested to send their kids to the school. they are still easy targets. even the hospitals are being targeted by the regime. we cannot call these as mainly liberated areas, because they are still targeted by the air force of the assad regime. that reflects the difficulties between the different groups of the three syrian army. we have borders with iraq and turkey under the control of the free syrian army. because of the absence of having a central command of the free syrian army, each border is controlled by a different group. there is a lack of authority which can extend its power. there is high risk for any
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9